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Best 30 Carbine Ammo

What is 30 Carbine ammo? 🧐

It is a type of ammunition chambered in the 30 Carbine caliber that was developed by Winchester and Remington Arms for use with the M1 Carbine, which was adopted by the US military in 1941. It is still used today for hunting and recreational target shooting.

30 Carbine ammo

Features πŸ’₯

The 30 Carbine ammo is a popular choice for shooters due to its versatility and reliability. Here are some of its key features:

  • βœ… Caliber: It is a .30 caliber cartridge that was developed for the M1 Carbine rifle during World War II.
  • βœ… Ballistic Performance: This ammo can reach velocities of up to 1,900 feet per second, making it a powerful round that is capable of significant damage.
  • βœ… Projectile Choices: It comes in a variety of projectile options, including a full metal jacket (FMJ), hollow point (HP), and soft point (SP).
  • βœ… Reliability: This ammo is known for its reliability. It is a proven round that has been in use for over 75 years and has earned a reputation for consistent performance.
  • βœ… Compatibility: It is compatible with a variety of firearms, including the M1 Carbine, Ruger Blackhawk, and Thompson/Center Contender. It is an excellent choice for those who own multiple firearms and want a versatile ammunition option.
Our Top Pick
30 Carbine Ammo
Whether you're searching for a good workout for your surplus or reproduction M1 carbines, these affordable rounds are sure to please! Crafted to the original cartridge standards and packed with non-corrosive Boxer primers and clean burning powder, users will find dependable function and consistent downrange ballistics. And thanks to reloadable brass casings, home reloaders will have the ability to take their savings even further.
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If you click this link and make a purchase, we earn a commission at no additional cost to you.

Benefits 😍

One of the primary benefits of using 30 Carbine ammo is that it is highly effective at both short and long ranges.

  • πŸ”₯ The round itself has been designed to have a flat trajectory, meaning that it can easily be used for shooting in close quarters as well as at greater distances without any significant drop-off in accuracy or effectiveness.
  • πŸ”₯ The high velocity and low recoil of the 30 Carbine make it particularly suited for use in semi-automatic firearms.
  • πŸ”₯ It is also known to be highly reliable, making it a great option for self-defense or hunting.
  • πŸ”₯ The round itself is relatively inexpensive and easy to come by, which means that you can easily stock up on ammo without breaking the bank.
  • πŸ”₯ In addition, many users find that they experience less felt recoil with this round than with some other popular cartridges on the market today.

30 Carbine Ammo

Ballistic Performance 🎯

30 Carbine ammunition is designed to have relatively low recoil and provide reliable performance in the field.

  • πŸ’‘ When it comes to ballistics, this ammo excels in medium-range engagements due to its higher velocity than other commonly used rifle cartridges.
  • πŸ’‘ At distances of up to 200 yards, these rounds will remain consistent with their trajectory and maintain good accuracy even at these longer ranges.
  • πŸ’‘ When fired from the M1 carbine, 30 Carbine rounds have a muzzle velocity of approximately 1,900 feet per second and will produce an energy of 883 foot-pounds.

Ballistics of 30 Carbine Ammo

  • πŸ’‘ For self-defense purposes, it is also a good choice due to its higher bullet weight than other popular rifle calibers. At 110 grains, it has more mass than lighter varmint cartridges like .223 Remington or 5.56 NATO and can provide more stopping power at close range.
  • πŸ’‘ Its higher velocity also gives it better penetration capabilities than some handgun rounds when fired from the M1 carbine.
  • πŸ’‘ Overall, this ammo is a great choice for shooters who need reliable performance in medium-range engagements but don’t want the recoil of a larger caliber rifle.

Best πŸš€ .30 Carbine Ammo Reviews

1# 30 Carbine – 110 Grain FMJ – Magtech

30 Carbine - 110 Grain FMJ - Magtech

50 Rounds

Searching for an affordable and reliable option for target practice or range training? Notice the Magtech’s 30 Carbine ammo. This newly manufactured ammunition features a brass casing, full metal jacket bullet, boxer primer, and non-corrosive propellant, making it a great choice for shooters of all levels. And with over 90 years of experience in the industry, you can trust that Magtech knows a thing or two about making high-quality ammunition. So whether you’re a seasoned marksman or a first-time shooter, make sure you give Magtech’s 30 Carbine ammo a try.

Pros:
  • Reliable
  • Affordable
  • Brass casing
Cons:
  • Neck thickness may be excessive for reloading

 

2# 30 Carbine – 110 Grain SP – Magtech

30 Carbine - 110 gr SP - Magtech

50 Rounds

Want to get an affordable and reliable option for target practice and range training? Pay attention to Magtech’s 30 Carbine ammo. These newly manufactured rounds are perfect for the budget-conscious shooter. Each reloadable round features a brass casing, soft point bullet, boxer primer, and non-corrosive primers. So if you need an affordable and reliable option for your shooting needs, choose Magtech 30 Carbine ammo – you won’t be disappointed!

Pros:
  • Soft point bullet
  • Boxer primer
  • Reliable
  • It’s great for target practice and range training
Cons:
  • May not work well with some older firearms

 

3# 30 Carbine – 110 Grain FMJ – Korean Military Surplus

30 Carbine - 110 Grain FMJ - Korean Military Surplus

1080 Rounds

Searching for a reliable and affordable option for your 30 Carbine rifle? Take a look at this 110 Grain FMJ ammunition from Korean Military Surplus. This ammo is a great choice for range training or plinking, and you’ll appreciate the low price point when you compare it to other brands. That’s 1,080 rounds of high-quality 30 Carbine ammo, all at a price that won’t break the bank. The brass shell casings are also Reloadable for those who like to hand-load their ammunition.Β So whether you want to stock up on 30 Carbine ammo, this Korean Military Surplus ammunition is the way to go.

Video review

Pros:
  • Efficient
  • Inexpensive
  • Brass shell casings are reloadable
  • It’s perfect for those who like to hand load
Cons:
  • It may have lower quality than some other brands

 

4# 30 Carbine – 110 Grain MC – Remington UMC

30 Carbine - 110 Grain MC - Remington UMC

50 Rounds

The 30 Carbine from Remington is a great choice for range and target practice. This new, brass-cased ammunition is boxer-primed, non-corrosive, and reloadable. It’s also a favorite among law enforcement agencies and avid shooters. With a bullet weight of 110 grains and a muzzle velocity of 1990 fps, you can count on this ammo to perform. So whether you need an affordable option for practice or you need reliable ammunition for your job, the 30 Carbine from Remington is a great choice.

Pros:
  • Affordable
  • Boxer-primed
  • Non-corrosive
  • Reloadable
Cons:
  • The brass casing may not hold up over time

 

5# 30 Carbine – 110 Grain FMJ – Wolf PF

30 Carbine - 110 gr FMJ - Wolf PF

1000 Rounds

Wish to spend a great way to spend time at the range? Or maybe you just want to stock up on some affordable ammunition for target practice or tactical training? Either way, you’ll want to check out the new Wolf Polyformance 30 Carbine 110 Grain FMJ ammo.Β This ammo is perfect for all sorts of applications, from plinking to target practice to tactical training. Each round is steel-cased, Berdan-primed, non-corrosive, and non-reloadable. Plus, it comes in a handy 50-round box, so you can just grab a few boxes and head to the range without having to worry about lugging around a big case of ammo.

Pros:
  • Steel-cased
  • It’s great for target practice
  • It’s perfect for tactical training
  • Berdan-primed
  • Non-corrosive
Cons:
  • Pricey

 

Reloading πŸ§‘β€πŸ”§

If you want to reload your 30 Carbine ammo, there are a few things that you need to consider.

  • ➑️ First, make sure that the brass cases used for reloading are in good condition and free of defects or dirt.
  • ➑️ Then, ensure that the primer type and size are appropriate for the caliber being used.
  • ➑️ Once those details have been taken care of, it’s time to look at powder types. It is important to remember that cartridges must never be loaded beyond the maximum pressure specified by the manufacturer.
  • ➑️ After all of the components have been selected, it is time to begin reloading.
  • ➑️ The process involves several steps such as cleaning, priming, powder charging, seating, and crimping. These steps should be done in order with a focus on accuracy to ensure safety and performance.

πŸ“Œ Keep in mind that reloading can be dangerous if done incorrectly so always follow instructions carefully or seek help from an experienced gunsmith or instructor if needed.

FAQ 🀠

How many rounds does a 30 Carbine hold?

β­• The 30 Carbine is a 30-caliber cartridge designed for use in the M1 Carbine.

πŸ”° It holds 15 rounds in a magazine.

Is 30 Carbine ammo still made?

πŸ˜‰ Yes, 30 Carbine ammo is still made by some manufacturers.

🧩 It is popular among shooters and collectors, so there is still a demand for it.

How much does this ammo cost?

πŸ€” 30 Carbine Ammo can vary in price depending on the brand, type, and quantity.

πŸ’΅ Generally, you can expect to pay between $0.20 and $0.60 per round.

What is 30 Carbine good for?

πŸŸͺ The .30 caliber carbine round is a popular round for handguns and rifles alike.

  • 🎯 It is an effective round for hunting, target shooting, personal protection, and even self-defense in some cases.
  • 🎯 With its low recoil and good accuracy at moderate ranges, it is an ideal round for a variety of different uses.
  • 🎯 For target shooting, the 30 Carbine provides excellent accuracy and reliability when used with quality ammo. Its mild recoil allows shooters to stay on target and make accurate shots consistently. The round also offers enough power to take down targets out to reasonable distances with a minimal kick.
Is 30 Carbine good for defense?

πŸ‘ The 30 Carbine round, designed for the M1 carbine in 1941, is still a viable defensive option today.

πŸ’₯ With modern loads offering better ballistic performance than the original ball ammo and soft points providing superior expansion, you can trust in the power of the 30 Carbine to defend yourself when necessary.

Conclusion πŸ™‚

30 Carbine ammo is a popular cartridge for sporting and hunting purposes. It can be used in rifles and pistols, and it offers good accuracy and stopping power. In this article, we’ve reviewed some of the best ammo on the market to help you choose the right product for your needs. Thanks for reading! πŸ˜‰πŸ‘

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Leon King
Leon King
16 hours ago

I’m interested in purchasing bulk 30 carbine ammo and I’m wondering what a reasonable price would be, whether it’s commercial or surplus, and if it’s corrosive or non-corrosive. I’d like to have a general idea of what to expect before making a purchase. Thank you.

Blayion
Blayion
Reply to  Leon King
16 hours ago

After checking the shop near my house, it seems that PPU 30 carbine ammunition is currently available for around 70 cents per round, but I didn’t find any surplus options. Most of the surplus ammo may have already left the market.

Lucas Jenkins
Lucas Jenkins
16 hours ago

The .30 Carbine is not a very popular round as it is only used in the carbine and Blackhawk firearms. The best price I could find for new production brass is 37 cents per round, which is quite expensive and makes it difficult to enjoy shooting my old Underwood. On the other hand, has anyone tried the reloads of this ammo and can vouch for their safety in a WWII USGI rifle?

Farnett
Farnett
Reply to  Lucas Jenkins
16 hours ago

It’s unlikely that .30 Carbine ammo will dip below 35 cents per round, but considering it’s not as popular as 5.56, 7.62×39, or 9×19, that price is quite reasonable.

Connor Moss
Connor Moss
Reply to  Lucas Jenkins
16 hours ago

It seems like I’ll have to either start reloading or consider trading my old one.30 Carbine for an AK. Paying $5 for a 15-round magazine is a bit too expensive for my liking.

Leonan
Leonan
16 hours ago

I am looking for information about guns chambered in .30 carbine. Besides the M1, Ruger Blackhawk, and Automag III, are there any other guns available in this caliber? I have done some research, but it seems like there isn’t much information out there besides some prototype rifles that were made a long time ago. If anyone has any recommendations or more information, I would be very grateful to hear it.

Justin Roach
Justin Roach
Reply to  Leonan
16 hours ago

There are a few other guns chambered in .30 carbine besides the M1 and the Ruger Blackhawk. One option is the BFR revolver, which is chambered in a .30 carbine. Another option to consider is Thompson Center’s contender model, although I’m not certain if they have a .30 carbine barrel available. It’s worth checking, as Thompson Center makes barrels for a wide range of calibers. Keep in mind that any of these less common firearms will likely be more expensive than more popular models.

Malgan
Malgan
Reply to  Leonan
16 hours ago

As you may already know, there is a reason why the 30-carbine round became obsolete fairly quickly. Despite this, there have been attempts to create modern rifles chambered in the caliber, such as the CT30. Unfortunately, the CT30 was not successful and only saw limited action in Brazil where it was not well received. While the 30 carbine is a great caliber!

Xavier Butler
Xavier Butler
Reply to  Leonan
16 hours ago

The Marlin Levermatic used to be chambered in 30 Carbine, and it’s a pretty cool firearm if you can get your hands on one.

Sandson
Sandson
16 hours ago

I recently acquired an M1 Carbine from WWII that doesn’t have a bayonet lug, and it came with approximately 450 rounds of LC 52 .30 carbine ammunition. These rounds are Chinese fakes that were made to look like USGI ammo during the Vietnam War, but they are highly corrosive. I am new to reloading and would like to know if anyone has any experience with these rounds in terms of reloading. I plan to pull the bullets, replace the powder and primer, and use the casings to reload some non-corrosive .30 carbine ammunition since this ammo is hard to find.

Josh Moore
Josh Moore
Reply to  Sandson
16 hours ago

According to my understanding, the only effect of using corrosive ammo is that it can cause rusting in the barrel, gas port, and piston if the gun is not properly cleaned after firing. However, if the previous owner was meticulous about cleaning the gun, then there shouldn’t be any damage. I’ve personally used old corrosive ammo in various firearms without any issues, so I wouldn’t worry too much about it.

Zaiduq
Zaiduq
Reply to  Sandson
16 hours ago

I’m not a reloader myself, but I’ve seen some mention reloading LC52 Chinese knock-off rounds. However, it seems to be a challenging and time-consuming process. In my opinion, it’s probably not worth the effort unless you enjoy the challenge. Instead, you could consider selling or using the ammo as is and buying non-corrosive rounds for future use.

William May
William May
Reply to  Sandson
16 hours ago

Please note that the following advice is not professional and should be taken with caution. Non-corrosive Berdan primers are available, but they can be expensive and difficult to find. Another option is to remove the bullets, use water and a wooden dowel to push out the Berdan primers, and then use a drill bit to drill out the two flash holes. This will convert the cartridges to use with non-corrosive primers. However, further research should be conducted before attempting this. In regards to potential damage to the rifle, unless the ammunition is over-pressured, the rifle should be fine. It is recommended to disassemble the rifle and check for any rust or damage.